VIDEO ARCHIVE

Physical Therapy in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome

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MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA - CHARLESTON, SC

FEBRUARY 9, 2017
Susan Chalela, PT has a unique perspective as a practicing physical therapist who also has joint hypermobility syndrome. In this lecture from the February 9th CSF educational meeting in Charleston, SC, she explains how and why physical therapy works in these patients.

For instance, individuals with hypermobile joints (from EDS or other syndromes) should be started at low- to mid-ranges of motion to avoid over-extending and injuring their already overly flexible joints. Posture is also super important: your head usually weighs about 12 lbs, but with improper posture, the head can have a weight of 32 lbs!

The most important takeaway? Physical therapy can help! Avoiding physical exercise may also be counter-productive. The best thing to do is to recognize the biggest triggers of pain: inactivity and abnormal movement. Getting moving while being careful to have normal and safe range of motion can help symptoms. (2017)

Revised: 9/2019